top of page

The Committee for Racial Healing (CFRH)

Mission Statement:

 

“To actively engage Trinity Episcopal Church and others in the community in addressing racism 

by the creation, development and implementation of sustainable programs and projects designed to

dismantle racism, utilizing educational and advocacy tools.”

The Trinity Committee for Racial Healing (CFRH) was formed in August 2020. The fourteen members bring diverse backgrounds and perspectives to plan for long-term sustainability.

The Committee for Racial Healing (CFRH) is one of the lesser-known ministries at Trinity because much of the work it does is not readily visible. 

 

There are several reasons to have such a committee.  First, to help build a beloved community by practicing Jesus’ Way of Love. The Becoming Beloved Community vision is a practical and theological framework guiding Episcopalians into racial healing, justice and reconciliation. It is a positive and biblically based ideal – a dream toward which we strive, and not just something we are against.

 

A second reason is to remind others of our Baptismal Promise: to strive for justice and peace among all people and respect the dignity every human being.

 

Another reason is to be the resource for Trinity’s work to dismantle racism.  Racism is defined as “the belief that different races possess distinct abilities, or qualities, especially so as to distinguish them as inferior or superior to one another.”  

 

Trinitarians can help with the work of the CFRH in several ways, as listed below:

  1. Practice Jesus’ Way of Love.;

  2. Increase awareness about anti-racism through reading books in the Trinity Library.;

  3. Participate in events and training to increase awareness of diverse groups;

  4. Talk to people about racism. For example, an uncle who tells racist jokes at family gatherings or a friend who wishes people didn’t have to be angry about equality.; and

  5. Contact Jean Hunt at email dehunt14@msn.com if you have any questions relating to the CFRH and/or would be interested in joining.

 

The CFRH is divided into four teams: the Education Team, the Outreach Team, the Mobilization Team, and the History Team.

The Education Team offers reviews of books to share with parishioners in the Trinity Newsletter and recommends books on anti-racism and racial healing for the church library.

 

 See below for a link to books recommended by the Education Team:

For a list of children’s books, click here.

 

For a list of middle grade and young adult books, click here.

 

For a list of adult books, click here.

 

Additionally, the Education Team periodically provides reviews of books in the Trinity Newsletter.  The full list of reviews can be found in the Trinity Library.

 

For the list of books reviewed, click here.

 

The Outreach Team is to reach out to racially diverse churches in the Fredericksburg area and beyond to listen to their efforts in dismantling racism.  

The Mobilization Team helped initiate several events for the congregation,, including:

  1. Parish Zoom: How to be Anti-Racist 

  2. Lenten Series Parish Read: “Love is the Way” by Presiding Bishop of the Episcopal Church Michael Curry;

  3. Movie Night: Trinity hosted Movie Night for St. George Episcopal Church since their parish hall was being renovated.  The documentary shown was “Doctrine of Discovery: Stolen Lands, Strong Hearts”, which raises awareness about the religious doctrine and its impact on Indigenous people and settlers.

   4.  Parish Zoom: Prayerful Conversations

The History Team researches local and commonwealth significant events relating to race for a Diocese of Virginia strategic goal assignment, due in January 2024. 

The Trinity History Report has been a three-year effort.  It includes researching Vestry notes, church bulletins, interviews of current and former parishioners. 

 

People can join the committee by contacting one of the CFRH members (listed below) or call the Trinity Church office phone number at (540) 373-2996. 

 

         Jim Carlock – Chairperson

         Jean Hunt – Vice Chairperson

         Wendell Anderson

         Ruth Brancolini

         Sylvia (Sam) Burton

         Lucretia Edreos

         Val Folden

         Selby McCash

         M.C. Morris

         Priscilla Barlow Rakestraw

         Kirk Richardson

         Karla Snelling

         Carol Walker

         Alda White

 

The best contact for the CFRH is Jean Hunt at email: dehunt14@msn.com.

 

Events the CFRH hopes to participate within the next few months include the following:

January 2024 -TBD

Diocese of Virginia- Submit Trinity History Report

February 2024 - Trinity Episcopal Church

Guest Speaker for Black History Month

Spring 2024- FXBG Visitors Center

Civil Rights Walking Tour

April 2024 -UMW Cedric Rucker University Center

Multicultural Fair

The CFRH encourages accessing the following links for more events and information/opportunities:

 

  The University of Mary Washington’s James Farmer Cultural Center  https://students.umw.edu/multicultural/programs/

 

  The Diocese of Virginia Racial Justice and Healing 

https://www.thediocese.net/resources/ministries/racial-justice-and-healing/

The CFRH will continue efforts for racial healing with goals to sponsor events such as :

 

  1. A parish panel discussion; 

  2. An offer to help facilitate the Lenten Series;

  3. An invitation for a special guest speaker to present on Racial Healing at Sunday services; and

  4. A training session on Unconscious Bias

“I’ve learned three things since being on the Trinity Committee for Racial Healing.  First, I’ve learned that institutional racism is worse than I could ever have imagined.  There are laws, policies and practices designed in the past to deny people of color benefits or rights granted to White Americans, such as Veterans Affairs (VA) loans.  Fortunately, this one has been changed to grant equality for all.

The second thing I’ve learned is that our diocese, the Diocese of Virginia, considers racism a sin.  I’ve learned that leading the Trinity Committee for Racial Healing is the main reason why the Holy Spirit led me to be a part of Trinity.  Last, but not least, I also believe the Holy Spirit spoke to the Senior Warden in 2020 when she asked me to head up this ministry.  As in the Old Testament in the Book of Esther, her uncle Mordecai told her, ‘Who knows why the Lord raised you up for such a time as this.’ The training and experience I had in my career has been put to good use in developing a plan to dismantle racism here at Trinity.  if we do our part and others do their part, then we’ll get through this together.”

 

                                                                        -Jim Carlock

Our Latest Book Review

Every month, the CFRH writes a book review over a text that examines race in society.

Junie.jpeg

Finding Junie Kim by Ellen Oh

Grades 3-7th

 

As the book opens, Junie Kim who is a middle school student, is dealing with bullying and racism. A school project leads her to have deep discussions with her maternal grandparents who were children in Korea during the Korean War. During the discussions Junie learns about her ancestry, about her grandparents’ choices and bravery during the war, and finds her own voice to speak out about racism as well as to stand up to bullying.



The book is beautifully written. The author “seamlessly provided insight into Korean history and culture for the unintroduced and captures the human condition during wartime through frank portrayals of Junie’s modern-day struggles…Oh’s powerful novel sheds light on the devastating effect racism can have, and tells a history often overlooked.” –School Library Journal.

Unveiling the Mystery About The Committee for Racial Healing

The Committee for Racial Healing (CFRH) is one of the lesser-known ministries at Trinity because much of the work it does is not readily visible. The questions and answers below are intended to unveil some of the “mystery” about the Committee. 

 

Q. Why does Trinity have a CFRH?

 

There are several reasons. One reason is to help build a beloved community by practicing Jesus’ Way of Love. The Becoming Beloved Community vision is a practical and theological framework guiding Episcopalians into racial healing, justice and reconciliation. It is a positive and biblically based ideal – a dream toward which we strive, and not just something we are against.

 

A second reason is to remind others of our Baptismal Promise: to strive for justice and peace among all people and respect the dignity every human being.

 

Another reason is to be the resource for Trinity’s work to dismantle mantle racism. Racism is defined as “the belief that different races possess distinct abilities, or qualities, especially so as to distinguish them as inferior or superior to one another.”  

 

Q. What has the CFRH actually done?

 

In the past two and a half years the CFRH has sponsored training on antiracism and participating in prayerful (courageous) conversations about race; reached out to predominantly Black churches for fellowship and understanding; written a number of articles for the Trinity Newsletter such as reviews about books on antiracism and the contributions of people of various races; and currently performing research to develop a history report about Trinity’s role in dismantling racism and showing the love of Christ to all people.

 

Q. When will the work of the CFRH be finished?

 

The work of the CFRH is ongoing and will continue until the Beloved Community is established throughout the world.

 

Q. What does It mean to be “Woke”? 

 

The term “woke” was first used among the African-American community to mean “aware of and actively attentive to important societal facts and issues, especially issues of racial and social justice.” It has become known in a way by some that is considered unreasonable or extreme.  

 

Q. How can members of Trinity help with the work of the CFRH?

 

Trinitarians can help with the work of the CFRH in several ways, as listed below.

 

1.Practice Jesus’ Way of Love.;

2.Increase awareness about anti-racism through reading books in the Trinity Library.;

3.Participate in events and training sponsored by the CFRH; 

4.Talk to people about racism. For example, an uncle who equality tells racist jokes at family gatherings or a friend who wishes people didn’t have to be angry about equality.; and

5.Contact Jean Hunt at email dehunt14@msn.com you have any questions relating to the CFRH.

CFRH Book Review
bottom of page