trinity update

There will be NO CHURCH SERVICES, Sunday School or Youth meeting until further notice.

Meetings at Trinity have been cancelled.
TRINITY OFFICE IS CLOSED.
The Rev. Bambi Willis is available for appointment by phone only. Please call the office, (540) 373-2996 or email Denise.
 
 

UPDATE:

A letter from Bishops of Virginia re: Planning for Regathering as Church can be found here. Trinity will soon offer guidance as to when it is safe to resume gatherings at the church. Until then, please stay home and be safe!

WORSHIP RESOURCES:

Trinity's Good News Daily ("the blue thing") can be found here.
Readings for First Sunday after Pentecost, June 7, can be found here.
Trinity's Sunday Morning Prayer services can be found here.
Online Worship - Sundays - Washington National Cathedral
 

monk's window

Monk's Window

If you have ever entered or exited Trinity’s nave by way of the door near the ambo (the pulpit) you have probably come face-to-face with the small stained glass window depicting a monk preparing a manuscript. Recently an article from an April 5, 1969 Free Lance – Star was uncovered and reveals the history of Trinity’s “Monk’s Door” as it has come to be known. A closer look shows the monk sitting at an ornate desk, working with a pair of dividers -- an instrument used to rule lines on pages so that a verse might be inscribed.

Helaine Patterson, author of the FLS article, writes that this stained glass window is the product of “picking up the pieces.” She shares further that this work of art dates back to 1288 when it is thought to have been first placed in the Amiens Cathedral in France. It’s believed that that bombs during World War I shattered the window, and the pieces were picked up by an Illinois architect, Elmo C. Lowe, who collected the pieces and brought them to the United States. In the 1940’s Lowe’s son, William C. Lowe, moved to the Fredericksburg area and began to attend Trinity’s first church at the corner of Hanover and Prince Edward Streets. Later Lowe became a member and loaned the glass panel to the church. At that time there was no way to display the window.  At Lowe’s death in 1951 the glass mosaic became a permanent possession of our church.

In 1959 when the present structure was built a place was planned for the medieval window.  The Rev.H. Shaw, Trinity’s rector during this period, hypothesized (according to Pattterson) that the monk is St. Jeromone, who was known as the great translator of the Bible. Patterson’s article concludes with these words: “After the stained glass window was installed in the door, glass for another window above the transom had to be obtained from England to match the dark, rich tones of the 13th century French glass.”

The colors of the glass scenes, especially when viewed as sunlight is streaming through the window, have a rich, jewel glow and the quality of precious gems. Make it a point to visit with “our” monk at your earliest opportunity.

By: Randall Clingenpeel, Vestry Member

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